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glasses vision

Lutein For Improving Vision

 

Do you struggle with poor vision? Have you noticed your vision failing you? Are objects (either from a distance or very close up) becoming increasingly blurry in the bright of day or the darkness of night? If so, then you need to know about the two powerful antioxidants found in common foods that may help your vision health: Lutein and Zeaxanthin.

Science has shown that both lutein and zeaxanthin bio-accumulates in the eye, particularly in the retina. This is where images of objects hit and the ophthalmic nerve submits those signals to the occipital region of the brain where we become conscious of what we’re seeing. This is why these two antioxidants are particularly important for vision health.

Where to find lutein and zeaxanthin

Although lutein and zeaxanthin are responsible for bright colors of many fruits and vegetables, they’re actually found in greatest amounts in dark, leafy, green vegetables. Interestingly, the chlorophyll in dark, leafy, green vegetables masks the color of lutein and zeaxanthin pigments so the vegetables appear green in color.

close up of kale leavesKale is one of the best sources of lutein, with about 115 micrograms per gram of kale. By comparison, a carrot may only have 5.1 micrograms of lutein per gram. Key sources of these two powerful antioxidants include:

  • Kale
  • Egg yolks
  • Parsley
  • Spinach
  • Broccoli
  • Peas
  • Paprika
  • Orange juice
  • Honeydew
  • Melon
  • Kiwis
  • Red peppers
  • Squash
  • Grapes

How to include lutein and zeaxanthin in your daily diet

a high lutein and zeaxanthin breakfast of poached eggs with steamed kale The great thing is that you can include most of these as breakfast. Egg yolks are extremely high in lutein and zeaxanthin. You can have a couple of poached eggs on a bed of lightly steamed kale, with diced red peppers and a sprinkling of paprika powder. As a side, have some honeydew melon and kiwis to start your day powerfully. It’s not too hard to start every day with breakfast foods that help improve your vision health!

 

vision-20 supplement by zenith labsHint: Fats actually improve the absorption of lutein and zeaxanthin so including fats into your diet may help the bioavailability of lutein and zeaxanthin. Adding some butter or coconut oil with your cooked greens or fresh salads is a great idea.

The team at Zenith Labs have created a supplement called Vision 20, which aims to improve vision health. Your diet should always come first, but supplements such as Vision 20 can give you a real boost. Check it out and let us know what you think!


dr ryan shelton of zenith labsIf you liked this video/article, do share it with your friends and loved ones. Subscribe to the Youtube channel for weekly tips on new tools and techniques to improve your health and well-being.

I believe in the original meaning of the word doctor, ‘docere’, which means teacher. I’m here to help educate you on how to take care of yourself in ways that you may not have heard of before, but that are effective. I always want to hear your ideas and feedback so be sure to leave me comments below!

 

 

 

mineral

Top 6 Mineral Deficiencies You Likely Have

 

If you’re struggling with a general sense of not being well, or you have poor health and it has not specifically been diagnosed as an underlying medical condition, you should read on. One of the potential contributing factors to why you may not feel at the top of your game has to do with mineral deficiencies.

Mineral deficiencies affect every system in the body and it’s important because it is actually rather common. We’ll be exploring the top six mineral deficiencies, seeing how and why those deficiencies can contribute to poor health, and the basic steps to take to correct mineral deficiencies.

What are minerals?

When we think about nutrition, there are basically two categories:

  1. Macronutrients: proteins, carbohydrates, fats, fiber
  1. Micronutrients: vitamins, minerals

fresh fruits in a transparent vitamin pill capsuleWhen we think about micronutrients, we tend to think about the importance of vitamins. Whilst vitamins are critically important for the body to work well, minerals are equally important and frankly, often overlooked and underappreciated.

Minerals are coenzymes required for your body to work. Enzymes basically control everything in every system in your body, from hormones to neurotransmitters, muscles and heart health to blood pressure. Every system in your body basically runs and churns on enzymes, and nearly all enzymes require minerals to work. If enzymes are deficient in those minerals, they do not work properly.

How to spot mineral deficiencies

scientist looking down a microscope doing micronutrient testingHow do you diagnose a mineral deficiency? The first step is just to learn about what the symptoms of deficiencies are. The second step is to get some laboratory testing to confirm those deficiencies.

Some mineral deficiencies are fairly straightforward and easy to diagnose. Examples include deficiencies in iron, iodine, calcium, and potassium. These minerals are tightly regulated in the body, and there are conventional standard lab testing that can help you find out the levels of these minerals in your body.

Other mineral deficiencies are more difficult to diagnose because they’re within the cells. They’re not freely floating around in the bloodstream so a typical phlebotomy or blood test may not pick them up as easily. There are specialty labs which take samples of your cells and grow them in a lab to help determine if you have micronutrient deficiencies of minerals, specifically minerals like magnesium and zinc. Micronutrient testing measures how micronutrients are actually functioning within your cells. These tests allow nutritional assessments for clinical conditions, general wellness, and the prevention of chronic diseases like arthritis, cancer, cardiovascular risk, diabetes, immune system health, and metabolic disorder.

The top 6 minerals

1. Ironiron-rich foods like spinach, eggs, red meat, and liver

Iron deficiency is one of the most common nutrient deficiencies in the world. It affects more than 25% of the world population, which is approximately 1.6 billion people worldwide. This figure rises to about 47% in preschool children. 30% of menstruating women may be deficient as well due to monthly blood loss, and up to 42% of young pregnant women may also suffer from iron deficiency.

Iron is an essential mineral. It’s the main component of red blood cells which binds with hemoglobin and transports oxygen to every cell in your body. It’s important for the electron transport chain (which involves energy production in the body), the production of thyroid hormones, and the production of dopamine in the brain.

There are two sources of dietary iron. The first is heme iron. This is very well-absorbed and it’s only found in animal foods. Red meat, in particular, contains high amounts of heme iron. The second source is non-heme iron. This type of iron is much more prevalent and common in our food chain, however, it is not as well absorbed as heme iron. Non-heme iron is found in vegetables and fruits.

The most common consequence of iron deficiency is anemia. The quantity of red blood cells is decreased and the blood becomes less able to carry oxygen to every cell in the body. Symptoms of anemia are fairly well known. They include tiredness, weakness, a weakened immune system, impaired brain function, and blue sclera.

Contributing factors of iron deficiency

  • Hypochlorhydria: Also known as having low stomach acid. Stomach acid is required to absorb iron.
  • Medications: Certain medications can inhibit the absorption of iron.
  • Over-supplementation: Over supplementation of other minerals like zinc, copper, or manganese can also inhibit the absorption of iron.
  • Large intake of various foods: A large intake of beans, legumes or grains can inhibit iron absorption due to phytates and lignans found in these foods. Hence, vegetarians and vegans have an increased risk of iron deficiency.
  • Beeturia: If you’re an individual that consumes beets, have a look at your urine the next time you pee. If it has a red tint to it, it may be a sign of iron deficiency.

Best sources of iron

The best dietary sources of heme iron include meats, organ meats, fish, shellfish, canned tuna, and canned sardines. The best sources of non-heme iron include beans and legumes. However, note that if you over-consume beans and legumes, the phytates and lignans found in beans can inhibit the absorption of non-heme iron.

Vegetarian sources include broccoli, kale, and spinach. In fact, one ounce of kale provides about 5-6% of your recommended dietary intake. However, you should never supplement with iron unless you truly need it. Too much iron can be pro-inflammatory for the body and frankly, may increase your risk factor for cardiovascular disease, stroke, cancer, and other health conditions. Additionally, vitamin C can enhance the absorption of iron, so eating vitamin C rich foods like oranges and kale and bell peppers during the consumption of iron-rich foods can be beneficial.

The best way to take iron is in small doses throughout the day. The recommendation is 30 milligrams, three times a day. It may take six to nine weeks before you see improvements within your body.

2. Iodine

iodine food sourcesIodine is an essential mineral for normal thyroid function and the production of thyroid hormones. Thyroid hormones are involved in many processes in the body, such as growth, brain development, metabolic rate regulation, and bone maintenance. Think of the thyroid as the accelerator in your car. If you’re pushing the accelerator too much, you reach that red line and the engine (i.e. your body) will be running too fast. If you press too little on the accelerator, you don’t go anywhere. Physically, your body will feel fatigued and possibly see weight gain.

Iodine deficiency is one of the most common nutrient deficiencies in the world. It affects nearly one-third of the world’s population. The most common symptoms of iodine deficiency is an enlarged thyroid gland, also known as “goiter”. It contributes to an increased heart rate, shortness of breath, and weight gain. Severe iodine deficiency may also include serious adverse effects, especially in children.

Deficiencies can result in dry mouth, dry skin, lack of sweating, weight gain, enlarged thyroid gland, increased heart rate, shortness of breath.

Contributing factors of iodine deficiency

  • Excess intake of selenium, calcium, and vitamin A may inhibit the intestinal absorption of iodine.

Best sources of iodine

  • Dietary sources include eggs, fish, dairy, spirulina and sea vegetables such as kelp, kombucha and other seaweeds.
  • Iodized salt

Be aware of the potential serious side effects or risk factors of taking too much iodine. The recommendations for iodine intake tend to be in the range of about 75 to 150 micrograms per day. It’s a mineral that you have to supplement with caution because too much can cause problems.

3. Calcium

calcium-rich food sources such as milk, spinach, cheese, and yoghurtCalcium is essential for every cell in the body. It mineralizes bone and teeth, especially during times of rapid growth and development. It’s also helpful for the maintenance of heart health, immune health, and insulin control.

One survey in the US found that less than 15% of teenage girls and less than 10% of women over the age of 50 met the recommended daily intake of calcium. In the same survey, less than 22% of young or teenage boys and men over 50 met the recommended intake. Symptoms of severe deficiencies in calcium include osteoporosis and rickets.

Contributing factors of calcium deficiency

  • Lack of vitamin D
  • Certain medications
  • Over-intake of phosphorous can inhibit calcium intake. Phosphorous is found in canned soda, bottled soda, and cola products.

Best sources of calcium

The effectiveness and safety of calcium supplements have been somewhat debated in the last few years. Some studies have found that over-intake of calcium can lead to an increased risk for cardiovascular disease. It is still recommended to get your calcium intake from foods rather than supplements.

Dietary sources of calcium include boned fish, dairy products, dark lean, dark leafy green vegetables such as kale, spinach, bok choy, and broccoli. Vitamin D and magnesium are required for good calcium absorption so make sure you have a healthy intake of these.

If you’re over the age of 50, the recommended total intake of calcium daily is about 1,200 milligrams.

4. Magnesium

food products containing magnesiumBetween 2004-2007, it was found that 48% of the US population consumed less than the required amount of magnesium. Low intake of magnesium has been associated with several diseases including diabetes, metabolic syndrome, heart disease, and osteoporosis. Low magnesium is particularly common among hospital patients and individuals over the age of 50.

Magnesium is a key mineral in the body. It’s essential for bone and teeth structure, and it’s also involved in more than 300 enzyme reactions. It is also important for muscles, nerves, and for activating ATP or adenosine triphosphate (which is basically the energy producer in the body). Furthermore, magnesium helps digest proteins, carbohydrates, and fats. It also serves as a building block for RNA and DNA synthesis, and it acts as a precursor for many neurotransmitters such as serotonin.

Because magnesium is the fourth most abundant mineral in your body, a deficiency can wreak havoc on your entire system. The fact that researchers have detected more than 3,750 magnesium-binding sites on human proteins should give you a sense of how important the mineral is for your body’s optimal functioning.

Contributing factors of magnesium deficiency

  • Certain prescription medications
  • Low levels of stomach acid
  • Stress
  • Processed foods
  • Fertilizers in the production of produce

Deficiencies of magnesium can cause constipation, eye twitches, muscle spasm, headaches and migraines, high blood pressure, heart arrhythmias, irregular heartbeats, coronary spasms, low energy, fatigue and loss of appetite. More subtle long-term symptoms that you may not notice include insulin resistance and high blood pressure.

Best sources of magnesium

The best source of magnesium happens to be the magnesium salt, magnesium aspartate. Other dietary sources of magnesium include avocados, nuts and seeds, brown rice, dark leafy green vegetables, oily fish, raw cocoa, and seaweed. Include these as part of your healthy diet.

Intake over the age of 40 is suspected and recommended to be above 420 milligrams for males and 320 milligrams for females. What seems to help magnesium absorption is calcium, potassium, vitamin B6, and vitamin B1, also known as thiamine.

5. Potassium

foods containing natural potassium such as bananas, broccoli, kiwi, walnuts and grapefruitPotassium is mostly inside cells. Sodium is mostly outside cells. Now the ratio of sodium to potassium has changed dramatically since the hunter-gatherer days because potassium is mostly in hunter-gatherer Paleo-type foods. Recent research shows that about a third to as much as half of individuals presently are consuming far less potassium than they need to be.

Contributing factors of potassium deficiency

  • Certain prescription medications like antibiotics and diuretics

Potassium deficiency can contribute to cardiovascular disease, fatigue, muscle cramps.

Best sources of magnesium

The best source is potassium aspartate, however food sources are always the best for these minerals. There are high levels of potassium in veggies, beans, legumes, nuts, seeds, fruits, meats, and dairy. An interesting fact about potassium is that there is a difference in potassium levels between boiled and steamed foods. With boiled foods, about 10 to 50% of potassium is lost compared to steamed foods where only three to 6% of potassium is lost.

The FDA has limited the potassium of supplements to 99 milligrams per serving.

6. Zinc

foods highest in zincAt least two billion people worldwide are thought to be zinc deficient. It’s due to a number of reasons, our processes of farming and our changes in dietary habits.

Zinc is important for DNA and protein synthesis, vision, hearing, taste, sexual development, wound healing, immune function, and skin health.

Zinc is thought to be an aphrodisiac and help sperm production in men, but it will only raise testosterone levels if the user is deficient in zinc. In very high doses zinc can act as an aromatase inhibitor in females and reduce estrogen levels, so use with caution if you’re menopausal or postmenopausal.

Contributing factors of zinc deficiency

  • If you’re an alcoholic, vegetarian, pregnant, or lactating
  • If you have a digestive disorder
  • High levels of sweat (athletes should be cautious)

Best sources of zinc

Dietary sources of zinc include dairy products, nuts, red meat, eggs, and seafood. Plant sources of zinc are slightly less well absorbed than animal sources.

If you’re over the age of 20, the recommended daily intake for males is about 11 milligrams, and 8 milligrams for females. The maximum daily dose of zinc supplementation is around 40 milligrams per day and it’s actually important to take copper along with zinc because excess intake of zinc can actually cause copper deficiency.

When you’re taking a mineral, it’s important to look at what salt it is. It’s always zinc with a salt. So it may be zinc sulfate, zinc gluconate, zinc methylthionine, or elemental zinc. All of these are absorbed very differently and affects the quantities you should take. Some examples:

  • Zinc sulfate – as much as 220 milligrams
  • Zinc gluconate – as much as 380 milligrams
  • Zinc methylthionine – 230 milligrams

It’s important to note that supplementation and recommended dosages should be considered on a case-by-case basis, based on pre-existing medical conditions and other minerals you might be taking. As you’ve learned, if you take too much of any one mineral, you can disrupt the absorption of other minerals.

The team at Zenith Labs have created a supplement called Pure Greens, which is a green powder high in minerals but well-absorbed because they’re complexed with their original foods. It’s a safer way than taking mega doses of individual minerals so do check it out and let us know what you think!


dr ryan shelton of zenith labsIf you liked this video/article, do share it with your friends and loved ones. Subscribe to the Youtube channel for weekly tips on new tools and techniques to improve your health and well-being.

I believe in the original meaning of the word doctor, ‘docere’, which means teacher. I’m here to help educate you on how to take care of yourself in ways that you may not have heard of before, but that are effective. I always want to hear your ideas and feedback so be sure to leave me comments below!

 

 

 

How Much Is Too Much Caffeine

How Much Is Too Much Caffeine? (Doctor’s Opinion)

Due to the boom in commercial coffee businesses and local coffee shops, there has been a significant increase in caffeine intake among adults, adolescents, and children over the past decade. This has also led to increased additive caffeine in common foods and energy drinks. All of this leads us to the question: How much caffeine is too much caffeine?

Caffeine is a drug

coffee beans coming out of a pill bottleCaffeine is the only drug that is present naturally or added to widely-consumed foods. In fact, caffeine is the most widely consumed psychoactive drug in the world, and one of the most comprehensively studied ingredients in our food supply. It is mildly addictive, which is one possible reason why makers of soft drinks add it to their products. Many coffee drinkers experience withdrawal symptoms such as headaches, irritability, sleeplessness, and lethargy or fatigue when they stop drinking coffee. Like any drug, the effects of caffeine on the body are not necessarily wholly good or wholly bad. Caffeine is a substance that may boost your mood, metabolism, and mental and physical performance. Recent estimates in adults suggest that about 85% of adults in the US regularly consume caffeine, with an average daily intake around 180 milligrams per day, about the amount of caffeine found in two eight-ounce cups of coffee.

topdown view of electrocardiogram line made with roasted coffee grains with a cup of coffee and a red paper heartHistorically, the addition of caffeine was limited to soda-type beverages. Over the past decade, caffeine has been added to a diverse variety of foods and non-food items to promote arousal, alertness, energy, and elevated mood. The recent increase in caffeine-containing food products and energy drinks, as well as changes in patterns of consumption of the more traditional sources of caffeine, has increased scrutiny by health authorities and regulatory bodies of the overall consumption of caffeine and its potential cumulative effects on behavior and body physiology. Of particular concern is the rate of caffeine intake among populations potentially vulnerable to its negative effects.

Health and regulatory authorities have recently highlighted the risk of consumption of caffeine among pregnant and lactating women, children and adolescents, young adults, and people with underlying heart and health conditions.

Caffeine content in food and beverages

Coffee

cup of coffee next to a burlap bag with coffee beans spilling out of it onto the wooden tableA 15 to 20-ounce serving ranges anywhere from 150 to 400 milligrams per serving. The average amount of caffeine in an eight-ounce cup of coffee is about 95 milligrams, but we do not drink coffee as our grandparents did. They had a cup or two of Joe in the morning to get the day started. We go and get a huge cup of coffee, and that influences the caffeine intake.

The amount of caffeine in coffee depends on many factors:

  1. Type of coffee beans – there are many varieties of coffee beans available, which may naturally contain different amounts of caffeine.
  2. The roasting process – lighter roasts have more caffeine than darker roasts, although the darker roasts tend to have a more rich, deeper flavor.
  3. Type of coffee – the caffeine content can vary significantly between regularly brewed coffee, espresso, instant coffee and decaf coffee. Yes — decaf coffee does contain small amounts of caffeine, typically seven to 15 milligrams per eight-ounce cup.
  4. Serving size – one cup of coffee can range anywhere from 300 to 700 millilitres or one to 24 ounces, greatly affecting the total caffeine content that you’re taking in.

Teas

different glasses of colorful floral teas on a white wooden tableEarl Grey tea contains about 110 milligrams per serving, the highest amount of caffeine amongst teas. The typical black tea ranges between 50 and 80 milligrams per serving. Iced tea ranges from 50 to 60 milligrams per serving, and green tea contains about 30 to 50 grams per serving.

 

 

Soft drinks and energy drinks

tall colorful glasses of iced drinksMost soft drinks range between 35 and 50 milligrams per serving. Energy drinks can vary wildly between 100 and 350 milligrams per serving.

 

 

 

Chocolate

bar of chocolate with bits broken off and a teaspoon with chocolate powderChocolate contains caffeine, typically between eight and 15 milligrams per serving, though the amount of caffeine in chocolate varies by the percentage of cocoa it contains.

 

 

 

Medication

small piles of white pills next to a pile of coffee beans on a wooden tableCertain medications contain caffeine, like Excedrin and Mydol, about 60 milligrams per dose. It’s included because research has shown that the addition of caffeine improves the potency of certain pain medications. Over the counter weight loss supplements typically contain caffeine as well.

Caffeine has a relatively long half-life in most individuals, ranging from three to seven hours.

 

Risks and Benefits of Consuming Caffeine

man in a suit holding a massive cup of coffeeWe do know that caffeine has some benefits for mental alertness and mental performance. Coffee and tea are also high in antioxidants and many studies show that they can be potentially good for your health.

However, getting too much caffeine is linked to adverse health effects like anxiety, insomnia, heart palpitations, and restlessness. Research has concluded that consuming four to 500 milligrams of caffeine a day is generally not associated with adverse effects in most people. This is about six milligrams per kilogram body weight or three milligrams per pound body weight, an average of four to six eight-ounce cups of coffee a day. That being said, caffeine affects different people in widely different ways. Some are very sensitive to it and others can consume large amounts without having negative side effects. This is largely due to genetic differences.

a stomach on a pile of coffee beansCaffeine and coffee may, in fact, reduce risk factors for certain conditions like gallbladder disease, Parkinson’s disease, and type two diabetes. However, it can worsen certain health conditions such as aggressive and violent behavior, anxiety, heart arrhythmias or palpitations, bipolar disorders, essential tremors, fibrous cystic breasts changes, GERD or acid reflux, high blood pressure and hypertension, insomnia, restless leg syndrome, hypoglycemia or low blood sugar, migraine headaches, and it can negatively affect bone mass density and contribute to osteoporosis. There’s a higher risk of miscarriage in pregnant women who consume large amounts of caffeine. If you have either irritable bladder syndrome or irritable bowel syndrome, it can worsen those symptoms as well.

In a recent FDA report, researchers concluded that there is insufficient evidence of safety nor a consensus of scientific opinion to conclude that the high levels of caffeine found in energy drinks are safe.

Medically speaking, caffeine overdose is defined as the following:

  • An excess of 250 milligrams of caffeine intake per day.
  • The development of five or more of the following symptoms: restlessness, nervousness, excitement, insomnia, flushed face, diarrhea, increased frequency of urination, gastrointestinal disturbance, muscle twitching, rambling flow of thought and speech, tachycardia/increased heart rate, increased heart palpitations, periods of inexhaustibility or psychomotor agitation.

coffee beans spelling out the word coffee with the shape of a heart above itCaffeine withdrawal disorder is diagnosed with an individual who experiences clinically significant impairment related to withdrawal symptoms after abrupt stopping of caffeine intake, including headache, difficulty concentration, fatigue, nausea, flu-like symptoms, and changes in mood. These symptoms of caffeine withdrawal typically begin 12 to 24 hours after stopping caffeine and may continue for three to seven days.

 

Caffeine Sensitivity

As mentioned above, genetics have something to do with your levels of caffeine sensitivity. It all comes down to an enzyme system called Cytochrome P450. It’s a detoxification pathway in the liver, specifically the Cytochrome P450 enzyme CYP1A2. The Cytochrome P450 enzyme system is the same enzyme system that metabolizes steroid hormones. Thus, steroid hormones slow caffeine metabolism.

woman holding onto a cup of coffeeIn women, this effect slows the metabolism of caffeine during pregnancy and when taking oral contraceptive pills. Oral contraceptives are estimated to double the half-life of caffeine in the system. We know that cigarette smoking doubles the rate of caffeine clearance by increasing liver enzyme activity, which may explain the higher rate of caffeine consumption among smokers. Substantial alcohol intake increases the half-life of caffeine and decreases its clearance.

If you’re looking for ways to give yourself an additional energy boost, we’ve created a yummy chocolate drink called Cacao Melody. It’s made from the beans that ultimately are made into chocolate. It contains a small amount of caffeine and additional vitamins and botanical agents to improve alertness and energy. Check it out and let us know what you think.


dr ryan sheltonIf you liked this video/article, do share it with your friends and loved ones. Subscribe to the Youtube channel for weekly tips on new tools and techniques to improve your health and well-being.

I believe in the original meaning of the word doctor, ‘docere’, which means teacher. I’m here to help educate you on how to take care of yourself in ways that you may not have heard of before, but that are effective. I always want to hear your ideas and feedback so be sure to leave me comments below!

 

 

 

smoking

What’s Worse Smoking Or Alcohol (Doctor’s Opinion)

We’re all gonna die. It is inevitable. Excluding accidents and genetic causes, the most common contributing factor to how we die is how we live and lifestyle choices. So when it comes to lifestyle choices, have you ever wondered which is worse? Smoking or alcohol? We’ll be looking at the statistics and effects of smoking and alcohol to evaluate if one is, in fact, worse than the other.

About smoking

fingers holding a smoking cigaretteNo matter how you slice it, inhaling any amount of cigarette smoke is bad for your health. A new meta-analysis study in the British Medical Journal found that smoking just one cigarette a day can drastically increase the risk factors for coronary heart disease and stroke. They found that men who had one cigarette per day had a 48% higher risk of heart disease and stroke. For women, the numbers are even grimmer. Women who smoke one cigarette per day have a 57% chance of heart disease and a 30% higher risk factor of stroke compared to non- smokers.

middle aged man breaking a cigarette in halfAlthough cutting down smoking has clear benefits (particularly for the risk of cancer), the reduction in cardiovascular disease risk is not as large as smokers would hope. Smokers need to quit completely (rather than cut down) if they wish to avoid most of the risks associated with heart disease and stroke, two of the most common and major disorders caused by smoking.

Cigarette smoking is responsible for more than 480,000 deaths per year in the United States, including more than 41,000 deaths resulting from second-hand smoke. Second-hand smoke accounts for about 1 in 5 deaths annually, about 1300 deaths every single day in the United States. On average, smokers die 10 years earlier than non-smokers.

young woman smoking a cigarette against dark blue backgroundThe tobacco epidemic is one of the largest, biggest health threats the world has ever faced. Tobacco kills up to half of its users, which is more than seven million people each year worldwide. More than six million of those deaths are the result of direct tobacco intake while 890,000 are the result of non-smokers being exposed to second-hand smoke. Around 80% of the world’s population live in low and middle-income countries where people are more likely to smoke.

If you’re a smoker, there is still hope. Quitting smoking before the age of 40 reduces the risk of dying from smoking by almost 90%.

About alcohol

close up of hand holding onto a glass filled with whiskyPeople drink to socialize, celebrate, and relax. Alcohol often has a strong effect on people and throughout history, we’ve struggled to understand and manage alcohol’s power over us. About 27% of people over the age of 18 have reported that they’ve engaged in binge drinking in the past month. 7% report that they’ve engaged in heavy alcohol use in the past month. Over 15 million adults over the age of 18 have some kind of alcohol-dependency problem. This includes 9.8 million men and 5.3 million females.

An estimated 88,000 people, approximately 62,000 men and 26,000 women, die from alcohol-related causes annually, making alcohol the third most preventable cause of death in the United States. The first is tobacco, and the second is poor diet and physical activity.

close up of waiter pouring red wine into a glassIn 2012, 3.3 million deaths, or 5.9% of all global deaths, were attributed to alcohol consumption. In 2014, the World Health Organization reported that alcohol contributed to more than 200 diseases and injury-related health conditions. Most notably, liver cirrhosis, cancers, and injuries such as motor vehicle accidents.

So, smoking is a worse vice than alcohol. No cigarette intake is safe, whereas science does show that alcohol intake, particularly red wine or darker beer, may be protective in extreme moderation. Drinking one to two drinks a day can be beneficial, but any more than that and it can be extremely problematic.

What happens if you smoke and drink?

close up on a man's hand holding a glass of beer and lit cigaretteCigarettes and alcohol are often used together. Studies have found that people who smoke are much more likely to drink, and that people who drink are much more likely to smoke. Dependence on alcohol and tobacco is correlated. People who are dependent on alcohol are three times more likely than those in the general population to be smokers. People who are dependent on tobacco are four times more likely than the general population to be drinkers.

We all have vices. However, it is prudent to understand that some of your vices may leave serious impacts on your health. Quitting smoking and/or drinking in extreme moderation will help prolong your life. The good news is, there are options. You can reach out locally to organizations, societies, or your local physician to get help.


dr ryan shelton of zenith labsIf you liked this video/article, do share it with your friends and loved ones. Subscribe to the Youtube channel for weekly tips on new tools and techniques to improve your health and well-being.

I believe in the original meaning of the word doctor, ‘docere’, which means teacher. I’m here to help educate you on how to take care of yourself in ways that you may not have heard of before, but that are effective. I always want to hear your ideas and feedback so be sure to leave me comments below!

 

 

 

long life

The 5 Commandments Of Eating Healthy To Live A Long Life

If you’re feeling inundated, overwhelmed, and confused about the best dietary nutritional program that you should eat to reduce your risk factors for chronic health conditions – you’re not alone. There’s tons of information online and tens of thousands of scientific research articles to examine just this topic.

Fortunately, there are a few common trends that come up over and over again, and the medical scientific community (for the most part) are behind these recommendations because they consistently show that they’re successful in reducing risk factors for chronic health conditions and promote optimal health and wellness. For the sake of this post, we’ll call them the Five Commandments of Healthy Eating.

I’ve made some other posts about foods to avoid. And if you haven’t seen them, I encourage you to check them out. And again, the scientific community is, for the most part, agreed upon these, like avoiding or limiting trans fats, avoiding or eliminating fried foods and fast foods, avoiding or eliminating refined sugars, and avoiding any kind of food allergy or food sensitivity that you may have. Some research articles show that Americans may have as many as one to three food sensitivities or food allergies in as many as 25 to 33% of Americans.

The five commandments of healthy eating

1. Increase fruit and vegetable intakes

various fresh fruits and vegetables laid out on a table

Research has shown that as few as 10 to 15% of Americans are consuming adequate recommended amounts of fruits and vegetables. Fruits contain important macronutrients and micronutrients, complex carbohydrates, protein, essential fatty acids, and fiber.

Fiber is an important macronutrient that is severely under-consumed by Americans. It’s recommended that you take in roughly 40 to 50 grams of fiber a day. Fiber is only found in the vegetable/fruit kingdom where we get those insoluble fibers, which research consistently has shown may reduce risk factors for the development of certain kinds of cancer and cardiovascular disease. Plus fruits and vegetables are high in antioxidants, polyphenols, and proanthocyanidins, that are important for every cellular function in the body. It is recommended to have nine servings of five colors each and every day.

2. Get sufficient essential fatty acids

different omega 3-and essential fatty-rich foods such as salmon, eggs, nuts and seeds

A report in 2010 showed that most Americans were not getting adequate amounts of essential fatty acids. The recommended intake is one gram per day (of both EPA and DHA), and even higher amounts if you have a pre-existing medical condition such as cardiovascular disease, or if you’re pregnant or lactating. Essential fatty acids can be found in seafood, nuts seeds, avocados, olives, and olive oil.

 

3. Plan meal schedules

a breakfast table with salad, fresh juice, eggs, fruits, croissants, and a cup of coffee“Eat breakfast like a king, lunch like a prince, and dinner like a pauper”. Most individuals are backward to that. They have a scant breakfast or they skip breakfast altogether. They have a modest lunch, and they have a huge dinner. This can be detrimental for blood sugar control and cardiovascular disease. Make sure to get most of your calories in the morning, have a modest lunch, and fewer calories for dinner.

4. Include cruciferous vegetables

top down view of cruciferous vegetables such as broccoli, cauliflower, and Brussels sproutsCruciferous vegetables are high in indoles, sulforaphane, DIM, and kaempferol. Each of these components have been independently studied to reduce risk factors for the development of certain types of cancer. We also know that cruciferous vegetables are very helpful for both phase one and phase two detoxification pathways in the liver. We’re all carrying chemicals so we could do with a little help in detoxification. Include cruciferous vegetables such as broccoli, cauliflower, kale, Brussels sprouts, and chard in your diet.

5. Eat organic

woman carrying a large wooden crate of fresh organic vegetablesIf possible, wherever possible, eat organic. They contain higher amounts of essential vitamins and minerals than non-organic produce. In addition, non-organic produce has been shown to contain a higher level of pesticide, herbicide, and fungicides. There are 12 foods that are particularly high in these chemicals: strawberries, spinach, kale, nectarines, apples, grapes, peaches, cherries, pears, tomatoes, celery, and potatoes. If eating organic is too expensive, try to just eat organic for these 12 foods at least so as to avoid the consumption of these chemicals. Plus, organic foods inherently contain higher amounts of essential probiotics, the healthy bacteria for our gut, for our brain, for our immune system.

So, there you have it – the five commandments to healthy eating! Let us know what rules you abide by for a healthier life and your experiences with these five commandments.


dr ryan shelton of zenith labsIf you liked this video/article, do share it with your friends and loved ones. Subscribe to the Youtube channel for weekly tips on new tools and techniques to improve your health and well-being.

I believe in the original meaning of the word doctor, ‘docere’, which means teacher. I’m here to help educate you on how to take care of yourself in ways that you may not have heard of before, but that are effective. I always want to hear your ideas and feedback so be sure to leave me comments below!

 

 

 

will fruit

Will Fruit Make You Fat?

 

Have you ever wondered if eating fruit will make you fat? If it could cause weight gain? Because of the high sugar content and high carbohydrate content in fruits, many researchers have looked into just this question.

You’ll find the answer here. Scientific research has shown that eating more whole fruit will not cause weight gain. In fact, just the opposite is true. Incorporating more whole fruit into your diet may help with weight loss.

bowl of fresh fruit salad with strawberries, bananas, kiwis, and oranges in a glass bowlHistorically, our hunter and gatherer ancestors ate a tremendous amount of fruit. Today, it’s estimated that less than 10% of most Western populations consume adequate amounts of whole fruits and dietary fiber. The recommended daily intake is 40 to 50 grams of fiber every day. Yet only about 3% of men and 6% of women habitually consume over 14 grams of fiber per day. This intake is about half of the recommended levels.

Fruit fiber is a relatively small component of the total dietary fiber consumed in populations eating Western diets. Between the years of 2015 and 2020, dietary guidelines for Americans named fiber as a major shortfall nutrient and it became an important public health concern. The low fiber Western diet has contributed to an increased risk of weight gain, inflammation, chronic diseases, and other health concerns. There is also an increased risk of colonic, or intestinal micro bacteria dysbiosis causing the growth of bad bacteria in your gut, and reducing the growth of beneficial bacteria in the gut. A growing number of human trials support the prebiotic effects of whole fruit and fruit fiber in promoting a healthy microbiome in the gut for gut health, for brain health, for immune health.

fresh vegetables and fruits laid out on a tableIn 2016, a dose-response randomized control trial with 122 individuals consuming fruit found that the fiber content of fruit and vegetables was more important than the polyphenol (or antioxidant) content found in those fruits and vegetables.

A number of protective cohort studies have observed associations between diets containing fruits and vegetables, and weight control, weight loss, and risk of obesity. A study in 2015, systematically reviewed a meta-analysis 17 studies of over 500,000 participants showed that fruit intake was associated with modest reductions in body weight, waist circumference, and a reduced risk of obesity by about 17%.

top down view of a breakfast bowl full of fresh berries in yoghurt

In 2016, a review article concluded that consumption of increased levels of whole fruit was uniquely protective against weight gain and obesity. Pooled data from three United States protective studies, including nurses health studies and health professionals, showed that over 100,000 men and women showed improvement in weight and reduced risks for obesity.

There was a longitudinal study done in Australia on women’s health. Over six years with a group of 4,000 women, the study found that women who consumed 117 grams of fruits and vegetables gained less weight than those consuming fewer fruits and vegetables.

Health Benefits of Fruit

woman holding up fresh strawberries and smiling

Evidence of the health benefits of consuming adequate levels of whole fruits has been steadily growing, especially regarding their bioactive fiber, prebiotic effects, role in improving weight loss, weight control, wellness, and healthy aging. Whole fruit contains water, fiber, and powerful antioxidants important in a healthy diet. The beneficial health effects of consuming whole fruit include:

  • Improving gut health
  • Lowering elevate LDL cholesterol
  • Reducing the risk of excessive weight gain and obesity
  • Decreasing risk factors for cardiovascular disease, coronary heart disease, and mortality risk
  • Reducing risks of several types of cancers, stroke, and type II diabetes

Eating whole fruits is the best way to get the nutrients you need. However, you could try to get your intake through juices too. Although most of the fiber from whole fruit is removed from fruit juice processing, 100% fruit juice should contain similar levels of other healthy vitamins and minerals.

Fun Fact: Frozen fruit may provide more bioavailable proanthocyanidins than even fresh fruit. Fresh fruit is still recommended but frozen fruit are an acceptable alternative in a healthy diet. Avoid dried fruit because it removes water and degrades some of the powerful antioxidants contained in the fruit.

frozen berriesNow, there are a few caveats you should know about. There are high glycemic fruits and low glycemic fruits. These are different and can impact blood sugar control and risk factors for obesity, risk factors for diabetes. High glycemic fruits include bananas, pineapples, watermelons, dates, raisins, passion fruit, and mango. Lower glycemic fruits include cherries, berries, apricots, pears, apples, grapefruits, plums, and peaches.

Another caveat is that there are some fruits that are listed to be at risk for pesticides. For these fruits, you want to try to make sure to go organic as often as you can. These are fruits like strawberries, nectarines, apples, peaches, cherries, and pears.

Let us know what your favorite fruits are and how they have impacted your health and wellbeing!


dr ryan shelton of zenith labsIf you liked this video/article, do share it with your friends and loved ones. Subscribe to the Youtube channel for weekly tips on new tools and techniques to improve your health and well-being.

I believe in the original meaning of the word doctor, ‘docere’, which means teacher. I’m here to help educate you on how to take care of yourself in ways that you may not have heard of before, but that are effective. I always want to hear your ideas and feedback so be sure to leave me comments below!

 

 

 

keto

The Ugly Truth About The Keto Diet

 

If you’re on a low carb ketogenic diet for weight loss, or if you plan on going on this diet or know of anyone who plans on going on this diet, you should know that there are hazards associated with being on a ketogenic diet, especially long-term. One of the most common problems to arise from being on a low carb ketogenic diet is nutrient deficiencies. These deficiencies can have chronic impacts on your health and body.

 

 

Low Carb Diets and the Ketogenic Diet

There are three versions of a low carb diet:

  • lean meat next to a pink measuring tape and a sign that says low carb diet Eating less than 50g of total carbohydrates a day. This is also classified as a “ketogenic diet”. Apart from nutrient deficiencies, adopters of this diet may also experience “keto flu”, especially during the first two to three weeks of the dietary transition. Keto flu symptoms include low energy, fatigue, malaise, sore muscles, and trouble sleeping.
  • Eating less than 150g of total carbohydrates a day. Your liver stores carbohydrates in the form of glycogen. When you’re eating a low carb diet, your liver can generate some glucose or carbohydrates, and 150 grams is about what the liver can produce for you. You may feel kind of crummy, find yourself craving more carbs, or even experience keto flu even if you’re not in ketogenesis or producing ketone bodies. If you’re eating less than 150 grams of carbs a day, try eating more protein calories to balance it out.
  • Eating less than 250g of total carbohydrates a day. The average American eats a little over 300 grams of carbs, so if you’re eating less than 250 carbs, that’s also considered a low carb diet, although it’s not considered a ketogenetic diet.

Nutrient Deficiencies on a Ketogenic Diet

ketogenic diet foods A large study done back in 2010 showed that out of the 27 essential micronutrients (vitamins and minerals that are typically included in a well-balanced whole food diet), six micronutrients plus four minerals can become deficient on a ketogenic diet. In the study, they were all identified as being consistently low, and they have a high likelihood of continuing to be low the longer that you’re on a ketogenic diet.

 

The four minerals that tend to be deficient on a ketogenic diet are:

  1. Sodium: If you’re on a ketogenic diet, make sure that you’re getting enough sodium. It’s important for so many processes in the body. Whilst an excess of sodium may be harmful, there is still a minimal amount that you should intake. Target about 1,000 to 1,500 milligrams of sodium intake a day. You can easily achieve this through seasoning foods with pink Himalayan or Celtic salt, using broth or bullion, or eating shellfish.
  2. spinach, pumpkin seeds, avocado, nuts, and tomatoes on a tablePotassium: Potassium-rich foods include spinach, chicken breast, salmon, beef, avocado, broccoli, asparagus, and mushrooms. Eat these foods while you’re on a ketogenic diet.
  3. Magnesium: Magnesium is important for over 350 enzymatic or enzyme processes in the body. It can become deficient when you’re on a ketogenic diet. Magnesium-rich foods include spinach, dark leafy green vegetables like Swiss chard and kale, pumpkin seeds, oysters, yogurt, and avocado.
  4. Zinc: Zinc is high in red meat, shellfish, beans and legumes, nuts and seeds, and eggs. It is one of the four important minerals for you to pay attention to if you’re on a ketogenic diet.

There are also six micronutrients that can become deficient when following a ketogenic diet:

  1. Vitamin B7 foods such as green peas, eggs, cheeseVitamin B7: Also known as biotin, vitamin B7 can be found in meats, eggs, nuts and seeds, salmon, dairy, avocados, sweet potatoes, cauliflower, mushrooms, and dark leafy green vegetables.
  2. Vitamin D: Vitamin D has had a tremendous amount of research of late because of its negative associations with chronic health disease, chronic cardiovascular disease, and cancer. Vitamin D is a unique vitamin that most people don’t get enough of. In fact, it’s estimated that more than 40% of American adults have a vitamin D deficiency. This vitamin is made from cholesterol in your skin when it’s exposed to the sun. That’s why getting enough sunlight is very important for maintaining optimal vitamin D levels. At noon, the sun is at its highest point and the UVB rays are most intense. That means you need less time in the sun to make sufficient amounts of vitamin D. Many studies also show that the body is most efficient at making vitamin D around noontime. For example, in the UK, 13 minutes of midday sunlight exposure during summer three times per week is enough to maintain healthy levels among Caucasian adults. Another study found that 30 minutes of midday summer sun exposure in Norway was equivalent to consuming about 10,000 to 20,000 international units of Vitamin D.

back of a woman in a bikini with sunscreen spelling the word sun on her backThe commonly recommended dose of Vitamin D is about 600 IUs if you take it as a supplement, but natural sunlight is always best. Not only is getting vitamin D around midday more efficient and more effective, but it might also be safer than getting some later in the day. One study found that afternoon sun exposure may actually increase your risk for dangerous skin cancers. Some scientists recommend exposing only around a third of your body area to the sun.

According to this recommendation, wearing a tank top and shorts for 10 – 30 minutes a day, three days per week, should give you adequate amounts of vitamin D. Just make sure to prevent burning if you’re staying in the sun for a long time. Instead, try going with some sunscreen after you have your 10 – 30 minutes of exposure.

  1. foods with vitamin E such as nuts and seeds on a round wooden trayVitamin E: Another vitamin that can become deficient on a keto diet. Make sure you get enough of these vitamins in your diet. Vitamin E rich foods include nuts and seeds, vegetable oils, seafood, avocado, bell peppers, mango, and dark leafy green vegetables.
  2. Chromium: Chromium can also become deficient in a ketogenic diet. Chromium-rich foods include those dark, leafy green vegetables, cruciferous vegetables like broccoli, cauliflower, kale, Brussels sprouts, red meat, green beans, and eggs.
  3. Iodine: Iodine can become deficient in a ketogenic diet, but can be replenished by consuming seafood and iodized salt.
  4. a bunch of green beansMolybdenum: Molybdenum is rich in beans and legumes, peas, lentils, nuts and seeds, dark, leafy green vegetables, eggs, and tomatoes.
  5. Essential fatty acids: Finally, essential fatty acids can become deficient in a ketogenetic diet if you’re not choosing the right kinds of protein that are rich in omega-3, omega-7, or omega-9 fatty acids. You can find these in nuts and seeds, seafood, and avocados.

Nutrient deficiencies tend to be problematic when you’re on a ketogenic diet. You should consider supplementation if you fall into one of the following categories:

  • If you’re pregnant or breastfeeding
  • If you’re an adult over the age of 50
  • If you don’t get enough sun
  • If you’re not getting enough calories on the ketogenic diet
  • If you’re not eating a wide variety of foods, including vegetables, meats, and fish
  • If you’re a vegetarian
  • If you have a medical condition that affects your health otherwise

Omega 3-7-9 + Krill by zenith labsThis does not make the ketogenic diet a bad diet to be on, it just means you have to be aware of your intakes. If you’re on it long-term (i.e. more than four to six weeks), know that there is a real chance you may become nutrient deficient if you don’t pay attention to your specific food intakes. Consult with your physician before starting any diet.

We’ve actually created a tremendously physician-grade effective omega supplement. It’s called Omega 3-7-9 plus Krill. It contains adequate amounts of omega 3-7-9, plus krill oil. Check it out because essential fatty acids is one of the deficiencies you may experience on a keto diet.


dr ryan shelton of zenith labsIf you liked this video/article, do share it with your friends and loved ones. Subscribe to the Youtube channel for weekly tips on new tools and techniques to improve your health and well-being.

I believe in the original meaning of the word doctor, ‘docere’, which means teacher. I’m here to help educate you on how to take care of yourself in ways that you may not have heard of before, but that are effective. I always want to hear your ideas and feedback so be sure to leave me comments below!

 

 

 

bloating

Top Foods That Bloat You (Stay Away!)

 

Do you struggle with intestinal gas and bloating? If the answer is “yes”, then read on. Learn about some of the most common causes of gas and bloating, top foods that contribute to gas and bloating, as well as what to do about it.

A recent study of 20,000 people showed that between 30-40% of them had experienced abdominal gas and bloating at least once in the previous three months. It is a very common issue many others like you have had to deal with. Intestinal gas and bloating can be physically uncomfortable. It can also cause physical distress and be embarrassing and awkward in social situations. If you’re able to hold flatulence and gas in, it causes more abdominal distention. If you’re brave enough to release it in a public environment, it can be an embarrassing phenomenon and cause emotional stress. Overall, it’s not a very nice situation.

Causes of bloating

woman holding a question mark around her abdominal areaThere are a number of causes for intestinal gas and bloating. It can be due to:

  • Low stomach acid
  • Poor output of digestive enzymes from the pancreas and liver
  • Parasites
  • Dysbiosis
  • Overgrowth of bad bacteria or yeast
  • Constipation, irritable bowel syndrome
  • Emotional distress like anxiety.
  • Food allergies

glass of milk, kiwi, lemon, chocolate, orange, and strawberries with a yellow tape across them saying "allergy"One of the most common causes of intestinal gas and bloating is actually food allergies. About 30-40% of individuals suffer from food allergies. Food allergies can be identified and avoided, and there are a number of ways to do this. There are blood tests and digestive tests you can do. The gold standard is something called “The Food Allergy Elimination Challenge Diet”. This is where you systematically eliminate foods from your diet for a minimum of four days (though 5-10 days is recommended). Then, one-by-one you slowly reintroduce each food to “challenge” your system and see which of those foods may cause gas and bloating.

The most common food allergies include wheat, gluten, dairy, corn, soy, coffee, tea, carbonated beverages, as well as certain types of fruits and vegetables.

woman holding her bloating bellyAny simple sugars can cause gas and bloating problems too. Simple sugars get into the digestive tract and can undergo fermentation. Fermentation is a process where yeast and bacteria in the intestine produce gas, and that gas translates into intestinal gas and bloating.

Dairy is a common food that causes gas and bloating. The sugar, lactose, is responsible for this. Some individuals lack the enzyme, lactase, which digests lactose, and when you do not digest that sugar it goes on down into the intestines and causes the fermentation process. Gluten-containing foods is another very common causative factor of gas and bloating.

Many individuals find that eliminating dairy and gluten foods is an enormous first step into reducing intestinal gas and bloating.

fodmap foods laid out on a tableResearchers have shown that individuals who avoid dietary FODMAP (Fermentable Oligo-, Di-, Mono-saccharides And Polyols) foods see a considerable reduction in the amount of intestinal gas and bloating. FODMAPs are actually short-chain carbohydrates that are osmotically active and fermentable. That means that when they’re in the intestines they alter the exchange of fluid within the intestines, and they cause the fermentation process which exacerbates gas and bloating. A common example of a disaccharide would be lactose, that sugar that’s found in dairy products. A common example of fructose would be honey and fruits. A common example of polyols would be sorbitol, which is found in many types of chewing gum, and also stone fruits such as apricots, plums, peaches, pears. An example of fructans, which is part of the dietary FODMAPs, include wheat, the allium family of vegetables, asparagus, and foods that are high in chicory. An example of high galactan foods would be beans and legumes and cabbage. Eliminating foods on the dietary FODMAPs list may be a clue into reducing your gas and bloating.

Probiotic T-50 by zenith labsHerbal products have been taken for centuries to help with intestinal distress, intestinal gas, and bloating. The most common ones include peppermint, fennel, caraway, chamomile, lemon balm, and ginger. Also, consider taking a high-dose probiotic to help restore healthy flora in your gut. At Zenith Labs there is a very potent probiotic called Probiotic T50, which contains 50 billion organisms of very high quality. If you’re looking for a good probiotic, that is one you should definitely check out.


dr ryan shelton of zenith labsIf you liked this video/article, do share it with your friends and loved ones. Subscribe to the Youtube channel for weekly tips on new tools and techniques to improve your health and well-being.

I believe in the original meaning of the word doctor, ‘docere’, which means teacher. I’m here to help educate you on how to take care of yourself in ways that you may not have heard of before, but that are effective. I always want to hear your ideas and feedback so be sure to leave me comments below!

 

 

 

joint pain

Arthritis Prevention and Joint Pain Masterclass

The next time you’re driving down a highway take a look at the road surface. You’ll see where cars have passed over the asphalt and concrete again and again, causing grooves, bumps, and cracks. Anytime you have repeated stress on a surface, no matter how robust that surface is, it’s going to degrade.

Arthritis Prevention and Joint Pain Masterclass

woman holding onto her knee in painTake your joints, for example. You stress them every day when you walk, sit down, get back up, and when you’re lying in bed. It’s unavoidable. Of course, our joints are designed to withstand moderate strain, but for many unlucky men and women over 45, their joints are just more susceptible to damage. And once the achy and stiff damage starts, it doesn’t take much to make it even worse.

It’s like a toy car going down an already damaged and bumpy highway. If that highway is already beaten and broken, even a child’s small toy car can make the damage worse. It’s only a matter of time and repetition.

If you do not want your joints to get increasingly worse like the asphalt of a highway, you need a way to protect your joints from decay.

Learn about the five pillars of joint health in this free masterclass. It goes through everything you need to know to get your joints back to being strong, resilient, and pain-free — no matter how fragile they are right now. To discover these secrets for yourself, click the link before it expires to claim access to your free joint health masterclass right now. Thank you.


dr ryan shelton of zenith labsIf you liked this video/article, do share it with your friends and loved ones. Subscribe to the Youtube channel for weekly tips on new tools and techniques to improve your health and well-being.

I believe in the original meaning of the word doctor, ‘docere’, which means teacher. I’m here to help educate you on how to take care of yourself in ways that you may not have heard of before, but that are effective. I always want to hear your ideas and feedback so be sure to leave me comments below!

 

 

 

fasting

Intermittent Fasting for Longevity

 

If you’re looking for the perfect meal to roll back the clock, stop embarrassing aging symptoms, and make you feel younger at the cellular level, this is it! You don’t have to give up your favorite foods for good, but if you’re looking for a way to ease aching joints, reduce fine lines and wrinkles on your face, and turn your body’s metabolism back up to where it needs to be to lose weight and reclaim your mental sharpness, then fasting should be a part of your diet. You should incorporate it now as part of your yearly routine.

thin woman trying to stop an overweight woman from eating a burgerStudies show that fasting — when done right — can actually stabilize blood sugar levels, reduce body fat, and combat inflammation. In fact, many cultures attribute their long, healthy lifespans to regular fasting. Here’s the catch: You can’t just stop eating. There’s a very specific and measured way you need to incorporate fasting to get the best results.

That’s exactly what is revealed in this brand new, Anti-Aging Masterclass. When you claim your spot for this master class, you’ll learn how to start reaping the rewards of fasting without going hungry or giving up your favorite foods, all while rolling back the clock naturally to make you look and feel younger.

We’re offering unlimited access to this Anti-Aging Masterclass for free if you claim your spot today. Click the link right now to get started! Bon appetite!


dr ryan sheltonIf you liked this video/article, do share it with your friends and loved ones. Subscribe to the Youtube channel for weekly tips on new tools and techniques to improve your health and well-being.

I believe in the original meaning of the word doctor, ‘docere’, which means teacher. I’m here to help educate you on how to take care of yourself in ways that you may not have heard of before, but that are effective. I always want to hear your ideas and feedback so be sure to leave me comments below!

 

 

 

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